Coming out of the woodwork . . .

It’s probably not surprising that, following the news that the Wycherley murders is set to be turned into a major new drama, people who were involved have started talking about it again. I mean, let’s face it, that’s exactly what I’m doing . . . although I’m publishing a book about it.

In a statement issued by Nottinghamshire Police, Chief Superintendent Rob Griffin has shared his memories and thoughts on the case. Rob Griffin – a Chief Inspector at the time – ‘took the call’ when he was working for the East Midland’s Major Crime Unit. We’d probably have called them ‘murder squad detectives’ a couple of decades ago.

Griffin appears as a minor character in A Garden of Bones, along with a number of police officers, pathologists, scientific experts and lawyers. I have made every effort to stick to the record here.

What he does in the book, he did in real life.

Speaking about the case, he said: “I have mixed emotions about the programme being made. It involves victims who have a family and people’s lives have been changed forever because of this. Having said that, I understand why people want to hear about this case. It’s a unique story and I will be interested to see how it plays out on television.”

“I have mixed emotions about the programme being made. It involves victims who have a family and people’s lives have been changed forever because of this”

Rob Griffin

Speaking about the case, he continued: “There had been no reports that they were missing. “I think it was Christopher Edwards’ intention that what he told his stepmother should make its way to the police. It’s not often that we start off with a part confession, effectively from the suspects themselves.

“We knew Susan and Christopher were in France. While we were preparing a file to try and get them extradited back to the UK, Christopher sent me an email saying they were going to surrender themselves to the UK border force in France. It was so strange; I thought the email was a hoax.

They were clearly motivated by money, but the use they put it to really doesn’t explain the meticulous lengths they went to in order to get it. They spent all of it on weird Hollywood memorabilia – they didn’t spend any of it on things like cars and holidays like you might expect.”

Stranger than fiction, it really is.

I fully agree though on the impact on the Wycherley’s relatives. I dealt with them quite extensively towards the end of the case. They were lovely people, and they seemed truly shell-shocked by it all.

2 thoughts on “Coming out of the woodwork . . .

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